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‘Beast of a snake’: Huge python caught in the Everglades could set a new record

‘Beast of a snake’: Huge python caught in the Everglades could set a new record

BY ADRIANA BRASILEIROOCTOBER 08, 2020 08:53 AM, UPDATED 55 MINUTES AGO

RYAN AUSBURN/FACEBOOK

Two Florida python hunters caught what could potentially be a record-breaking Burmese python in the Everglades last week.

Ryan Ausburn and Kevin Pavlidis said on social media that official measurements of the enormous female snake are being taken this week.

“On Friday night we pulled this BEAST of a snake out of waist-deep water in the middle of the night, deep in the Everglades. I have never seen a snake anywhere near this size and my hands were shaking as I approached her,” Pavlidis wrote on his Facebook page.TOP ARTICLESHurricane watches issued for northern Gulf Coast ahead of Hurricane Delta landfallTrump: ‘I’m not going to waste my time on a virtual debate’ in Miami after format changeFire rips through several beachfront restaurants on  the Hollywood BroadwalkPolitical newcomers compete for Miami-Dade House seat in District 114Family: Opa-locka police dragged handcuffed teen down steps in fracas caught on video00:06/00:30SKIP AD

The current state record for length is 18.8 feet.

Ausburn and Pavlidis said they are paid snake hunters working for the South Florida Water Management District and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which manage the state’s python elimination programs.

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This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.Play VideoDuration 1:45Burmese python found on boat in Coral GablesWranglers removed an eight-foot long Burmese python from the bridge of a boat in Coral Gables, Florida. . BY FLORIDA’S WILDEST

The invasive snakes are among the biggest threats to the fragile Everglades ecosystem, devouring mammals and bird eggs and disrupting the natural balance of predator and prey. Scientists don’t know exactly how many live in the marshes and tree islands, but some estimates point to between 100,000 and 300,000 snakes.Listen to today’s top stories from the Miami Herald:https://player.spokenlayer.net/miami-herald?urlSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Amazon Alexa | Google Assistant | More options

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Invasive Burmese pythons are among the biggest threats to the Everglades as they devour native animals and disrupt the balance of the fragile ecosystem. AL DIAZ ADIAZ@MIAMIHERALD.COM

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