New form of solar energy to enter US market

New form of solar energy to enter US market

“Conceptually, it’s a whole new thought process on how we make power.”

ByLeighton SchneiderDecember 19, 2020, 11:55 AM• 6 min read

NOTIFIED: Dec. 18, 2020

2:46

NOTIFIED: Dec. 18, 2020

Catch up on the developing stories making headlines.GO-OPV

Organic energy is getting a jolt with the launch of GO-OPV’s ORENgE system in North America.

Organic energy uses a thin film panel to capture the sun’s rays and converts it to power, similar to traditional solar power.MORE: Renewable energy capacity to set new record in 2020: Report

The panels could be used for windows or trucks, phone or computer chargers, or it can be a building-integrated photovoltaics in glass.

PHOTO: GO-OPV's ORENgE solar power technology installed on the roof of a long-haul trailer can provide the vehicle with a power supply for onboard electronics as well as battery units.
GO-OPVGO-OPVGO-OPV’s ORENgE solar power technology installed on the roof of a long-haul trailer can provid…Read More

“Organic energy makes power from light at any angle, in any way. It’s totally flexible because it’s just printed ink. Conceptually, it’s a whole new thought process on how we make power,” said Paul Frischer, President of GO-OPV, an organic energy company.

What makes organic energy different from solar power is that it is light-dependent, not sun dependent, meaning it will always create power as long as there is some form of natural light.

“It manages low light, indoor light, diffused light, any form of light. If I’m sitting here in the office, I’m able to produce power because I don’t necessarily need direct sunlight to do that,” said Frischer.

Organic energy isn’t a new concept. Companies, like View Inc., use the technology as a way to reduce glare and heat through the use of smart windows in buildings.

“All the applications that you would normally see done for a heat gain application we can now do with ORENgE panels. Not only do you get the benefit of the heat gain, but we’re also now generating the power,” said Frischer.

PHOTO: GO-OPV's ORENgE solar power technology is installed on an outdoor table.
GO-OPVGO-OPVGO-OPV’s ORENgE solar power technology is installed on an outdoor table in an undated handout photo.

“We can build a platform of energy that doesn’t exist currently. And the base for the whole technology is the OPV [organic photovoltaic] film, which is an organic, transparent, lightweight film that can be 100% recyclable,” said Felipe Travesso, COO of GO-OPV.

Producing the OPV also has a lower impact on the environment compared to silicon solar panels.

“Traditional solar is a very heavy-duty, industrial process. You have to get the actual silicon, you have to heat it. It is a very dense process. That builds a carbon footprint. OPV, it’s completely different. We don’t use as much energy to produce the process. It’s a roll to roll industrial process in a clean room with a zero-carbon footprint,” said Travesso.MORE: Green cement: Startup aims to solve construction’s carbon emissions problem

In Brazil, the company has installed systems on skylights, malls, and building windows.

In the U.S., they have installed systems in three buildings: two in New York and one at its office in Delray Beach, Florida.

PHOTO: GO-OPV's ORENgE solar power technology is applied to a building’s windows as part of a power system that can provide electricity for the property’s lighting, electronics, and more in an undated handout photo.
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