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United States Senate elections, 2020

United States Senate elections, 2020

  • PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION
  • CONGRESS ELECTIONS
  • STATE ELECTIONS
  • LOCAL ELECTIONS
  • VOTER INFORMATION
 20182022 


2020 U.S. Senate Elections
Election Date
November 3, 2020
U.S. Senate Elections by State
Alabama • Alaska • Arizona (special) • Arkansas • Colorado • Delaware • Georgia • Idaho • Illinois • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Montana • Nebraska • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • North Carolina • Oklahoma • Oregon • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Virginia • West Virginia • Wyoming
U.S. House Elections

Elections to the U.S. Senate will be held on November 3, 2020. A total of 33 of the 100 seats are up for regular election.

Those elected to the U.S. Senate in the 33 regular elections on November 3, 2020, will begin their six-year terms on January 3, 2021.

Special elections will also occur to fill vacancies in the 116th Congress, including 2020 special U.S. Senate elections in Arizona for the seat that John McCain (R) won in 2016 and in Georgia for the seat that Johnny Isakson (R) won in 2016.

Twelve seats held by Democrats and 23 seats held by Republicans are up for election in 2020. Heading into the election, Republicans have a majority with 53 seats. Democrats would need a net gain of four seats, or three in addition to winning the presidential election, to take control of the chamber. The vice president casts tie-breaking votes in the Senate.

On this page, you will find:

https://83716d5a6afc994cbfd7a5a1780481d0.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Partisan breakdown

Republicans gained two Senate seats in the 2018 general elections, bringing their majority up to 53. Democrats held 45 seats following the election, and independents who caucus with Democrats held two.

U.S. Senate Partisan Breakdown
PartyAs of January 3, 2019After the 2020 Election
    Democratic Party45Pending
    Republican Party53Pending
    Independent2Pending
    Vacancies00
Total100100


The chart below shows historical partisan breakdown information for the chamber.

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/hCF0u/4/
[show]Click “show” to the right to read about changes in partisan control in the Senate since 2000. 

Seats up for election

Staff Writer Marielle Bricker gives an overview of the 2020 United States Senate election. View other episodes here.


Twelve seats held by Democrats and 23 seats held by Republicans are up for election in 2020, including the Arizona special election and the Georgia special election. In 2014, the Republican Party picked up nine seats, resulting in their having more seats to defend in 2020. The map and table below show what seats are up for election and the current incumbent in each race.

2020 Senate elections
StatePre-election incumbentYear first electedLast election margin of victory (% points)
Alabama Doug Jones20171.7
Alaska Dan Sullivan20142.2
Arizona Martha McSallyN/A13.7
Arkansas Tom Cotton201417.0
Colorado Cory Gardner20141.9
Delaware Chris Coons201013.6
Georgia David Perdue20147.7
Georgia Kelly LoefflerN/A13.8
Idaho Jim Risch200830.6
Illinois Dick Durbin199610.8
Iowa Joni Ernst20148.3
Kansas Pat Roberts199610.6
Kentucky Mitch McConnell198415.5
Louisiana Bill Cassidy201411.8
Maine Susan Collins199636.2
Massachusetts Ed Markey201322.8
Michigan Gary Peters201413.3
Minnesota Tina Smith201810.6
Mississippi Cindy Hyde-Smith20187.2
Montana Steve Daines201417.7
Nebraska Ben Sasse201432.9
New Hampshire Jeanne Shaheen20083.3
New Jersey Cory Booker201313.5
New Mexico Tom Udall200811.2
North Carolina Thom Tillis20141.5
Oklahoma Jim Inhofe199439.5
Oregon Jeff Merkley200818.8
Rhode Island Jack Reed199641.4
South Carolina Lindsey Graham200215.7
South Dakota Mike Rounds201420.9
Tennessee Lamar Alexander201430.0
Texas John Cornyn200227.2
Virginia Mark Warner20080.8
West Virginia Shelley Moore Capito201427.6
Wyoming Mike Enzi199654.8
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Battleground elections

See also: U.S. Senate battlegrounds, 2020

Ballotpedia has identified 16 races as general election battlegrounds. Of the 16 seats, four have Democratic incumbents and 12 have Republican incumbents heading into the election.

These battleground seats were selected by examining the results of the 2016 presidential election in the state, whether the incumbent was seeking re-election, and whether the incumbent was serving his or her first term in the Senate. Race ratings from the Cook Political ReportSabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections with Nathan Gonzales were also considered. For more information on our methodology, click here.

The following map displays the 2020 Senate battlegrounds shaded by the incumbent’s or most recent incumbent’s political affiliation. Hover over a state for more information.

Battleground U.S. Senate elections, 2020
StateIncumbentOpen seat?2014 margin2016 presidential margin
Alabama Doug JonesNoR+94.5R+27.7
Arizona (special) Martha McSallyNoR+13.0[2]R+3.5
Colorado Cory GardnerNoR+1.9D+4.9
Georgia David PerdueNoR+7.7R+5.2
Georgia (special) Kelly LoefflerNoR+13.8[3]R+5.2
Iowa Joni ErnstNoR+8.3R+9.4
Kansas Pat RobertsYesR+10.6R+20.6
Kentucky Mitch McConnellNoR+15.5R+29.8
Maine Susan CollinsNoR+36.2D+3.0
Michigan Gary PetersNoD+13.3R+0.2
Minnesota Tina SmithNoD+10.2D+1.5
Montana Steve DainesNoR+17.7R+20.5
New Hampshire Jeanne ShaheenNoD+3.2D+0.4
North Carolina Thom TillisNoR+1.6R+3.7
South Carolina Lindsey GrahamNoR+17.7R+14.2
Texas John CornynNoR+27.2R+9.0

Seats that changed party hands in 2014

See also: United States Senate elections, 2014

In 2014—the last time the 33 seats up for regular election in 2020 were up for election—nine seats changed party hands. Republicans picked up all nine seats.

Senate seats that changed party hands, 2014
StatePre-election incumbent2014 winnerMargin of victory (% points)2020 rating: Cook[4]2020 rating: Inside Elections[5]2020 rating: Sabato[6]
Alaska Mark Begich Dan Sullivan2.2Likely RepublicanLikely RepublicanLikely Republican
Arkansas Mark Pryor Tom Cotton17.0Solid RepublicanSolid RepublicanSafe Republican
Colorado Mark Udall Cory Gardner1.9Toss-upTilt DemocraticLean Democratic
Iowa Tom Harkin Joni Ernst8.3Toss-upToss-upToss-up
Louisiana Mary Landrieu Bill Cassidy11.8Solid RepublicanSolid RepublicanSafe Republican
Montana John Walsh Steve Daines17.7Toss-upToss-upLean Republican
North Carolina Kay Hagan Thom Tillis1.5Toss-upToss-upToss-up
South Dakota Tim Johnson Mike Rounds20.9Solid RepublicanSolid RepublicanSafe Republican
West Virginia Jay Rockefeller Shelley Moore Capito27.6Solid RepublicanSolid RepublicanSafe Republican

Outside ratings

The following table compares U.S. Senate race ratings from The Cook Political ReportSabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections as of September 2020.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vS9a9ZQ1fuEJTJDaHr_l020mLxarOYN_DmeLNc9VmqCDqtARStP6bF1PuFNI5GlwqBiATcCR3mwtiaB/pubhtml?gid=574950020&single=true

Fundraising by candidate

The following table shows the top U.S. Senate fundraisers of the 2020 election cycle based on FEC filings through either June 30 or July 15, 2020.

Fundraising by party

See also: Party committee fundraising, 2019-2020

Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee

See also: Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/WMwRm/13/ The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) reported the following fundraising amounts for the 2019-20 election cycle:

Monthly fundraising for the DSCC for the 2019-20 election cycle
Month
(Dates covered)
Total receiptsTotal disbursementsCash on hand (end of month)Debts owed (end of month)FEC document
September 2020
(August 1-31, 2020)
$26,933,943.47$25,951,407.81$40,990,760.36$685,632.46Filing
August 2020
(July 1-31, 2020)
$13,126,055.11$10,856,069.90$40,008,224.70$707,011.35Filing
July 2020
(June 1-30, 2020)
$13,594,066.34$8,212,855.51$37,738,239.49$728,395.24Filing
June 2020
(May 1-31, 2020)
$11,241,636.65$7,691,856.06$32,357,028.66$749,595.76Filing
May 2020
(Apr. 1-30, 2020)
$8,956,862.79$5,028,784.99$28,807,248.07$770,411.86Filing
April 2020
(Mar. 1-31, 2020)
$10,992,303.31$6,057,453.55$24,879,170.27$790,686.39Filing
March 2020
(Feb. 1-29, 2020)
$8,887,049.10$8,693,457.16$19,944,320.51$1,810,934.04Filing
February 2020
(Jan. 1-31, 2020)
$8,546,346.55$7,464,236.52$19,750,728.57$4,830,923.92Filing
Year-End 2019
(Dec. 1-31, 2019)
$7,321,304.42$5,989,621.81$18,668,618.52$6,850,905.89Filing
December 2019
(Nov. 1-30, 2019)
$5,751,538.91$5,768,449.98$17,336,935.91$7,870,851.77Filing
November 2019
(Oct. 1-31, 2019)
$5,385,905.73$5,634,676.70$17,353,846.98$9,890,430.12Filing
October 2019
(Sept. 1-30, 2019)
$6,758,475.89$5,344,759.24$17,602,617.95$11,909,994.54Filing
September 2019
(Aug. 1-31, 2019)
$4,740,235.97$5,500,212.89$16,188,901.30$13,929,262.72Filing
August 2019
(July 1-31, 2019)
$4,787,675.39$2,629,871.71$16,948,878.22$15,948,312.35Filing
July 2019
(June 1-30, 2019)
$5,546,286.08$3,863,708.54$14,791,074.54$15,967,382.88Filing
June 2019
(May 1-31, 2019)
$4,512,788.16$5,330,937.09$13,108,497.00$0.00Filing
May 2019
(Apr. 1-30, 2019)
$4,360,277.62$3,217,150.73$13,921,920.07$19,005,065.53Filing
April 2019
(Mar. 1-31, 2019)
$5,875,324.31$4,298,364.03$12,778,793.18$19,163,559.94Filing
March 2019
(Feb. 1-28, 2019)
$3,836,700.57$1,584,704.25$11,201,832.90$21,042,710.77Filing
February 2019
(Jan. 1-31, 2019)
$4,045,134.75$1,280,456.07$8,949,836.58$21,061,176.57Filing

National Republican Senatorial Committee

See also: National Republican Senatorial Committee

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/5cfEz/12/ The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) reported the following fundraising amounts for the 2019-20 election cycle:

Monthly fundraising for the NRSC for the 2019-20 election cycle
Month
(Dates covered)
Total receiptsTotal disbursementsCash on hand (end of month)Debts owed (end of month)FEC document
September 2020
(August 1-31, 2020)
$19,011,898.74$21,811,488.95$13,589,661.92$0.00Filing
August 2020
(July 1-31, 2020)
$15,049,387.89$29,204,894.32$16,389,252.13$0.00Filing
July 2020
(June 1-30, 2020)
$14,010,051.79$23,499,907.40$30,544,758.56$0.00Filing
June 2020
(May 1-31, 2020)
$10,104,413.14$7,894,583.70$40,034,614.17$0.00Filing
May 2020
(Apr. 1-30, 2020)
$11,507,707.90$6,218,053.90$37,827,284.73$0.00Filing
April 2020
(Mar. 1-31, 2020)
$9,085,278.89$6,924,004.69$32,537,630.73$0.00Filing
March 2020
(Feb. 1-29, 2020)
$11,177,348.56$6,035,717.70$30,376,356.53$0.00Filing
February 2020
(Jan. 1-31, 2020)
$10,054,892.65$4,830,386.02$25,234,725.67$0.00Filing
Year-End 2019
(Dec. 1-31, 2019)
$7,011,164.74$5,011,674.33$20,010,219.04$0.00Filing
December 2019
(Nov. 1-30, 2019)
$6,239,031.10$3,233,010.22$18,010,728.63$0.00Filing
November 2019
(Oct. 1-31, 2019)
$6,693,286.68$4,757,833.35$15,004,707.75$0.00Filing
October 2019
(Sept. 1-30, 2019)
$5,070,354.27$3,636,725.01$13,069,254.42$0.00Filing
September 2019
(Aug. 1-31, 2019)
$3,711,685.29$3,778,870.03$11,635,625.16$1,275,000.00Filing
August 2019
(July 1-31, 2019)
$4,346,443.23$5,207,700.04$11,702,809.90$2,275,000.00Filing
July 2019
(June 1-30, 2019)
$5,716,943.47$4,425,850.59$12,564,066.71$4,500,000.00Filing
June 2019
(May 1-31, 2019)
$4,841,510.07$4,872,670.02$11,272,973.83$6,000,000.00Filing
May 2019
(Apr. 1-30, 2019)
$4,525,407.72$5,312,206.62$11,304,133.78$7,500,000.00Filing
April 2019
(Mar. 1-31, 2019)
$7,549,651.35$5,030,433.85$12,090,932.68$9,000,000.00Filing
March 2019
(Feb. 1-28, 2019)
$6,384,969.14$4,402,730.52$9,571,715.18$12,000,000.00Filing
February 2019
(Jan. 1-31, 2019)
$5,579,820.31$5,488,279.53$7,589,476.56$14,000,000.00Filing

Filed candidates by political party

As of September 7, 2020, 519 candidates were filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate in 2020. Of those, 402—199 Democrats and 203 Republicans—were from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

The following chart shows the number of filed candidates by political party.

Incumbents not seeking re-election in 2020

See also: List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020

Ballotpedia will add to this list if more senators announce they will not seek re-election.

  •  1 Democrat
  •  3 Republicans
Retiring from public office, 2020
NamePartyStateDate announced
Lamar Alexander RepublicanTennesseeDecember 17, 2018
Mike Enzi RepublicanWyomingMay 4, 2019
Pat Roberts RepublicanKansasJanuary 4, 2019
Tom Udall DemocraticNew MexicoMarch 25, 2019

Historical comparison

The following table includes figures on Democratic and Republican members of Congress who either left office during their term or announced that they would not seek re-election for each election year since 2012.

[hide]Outgoing members of Congress, 2012-2018
YearChamberDemocrats not seeking re-electionRepublicans not seeking re-electionTotal not seeking re-electionDemocrats leaving office earlyRepublicans leaving office earlyTotal leaving office early
2018
U.S. Senate033123
U.S. House18345231417
Total18375541620
2016
U.S. Senate325000
U.S. House162440257
Total192645257
2014
U.S. Senate527325
U.S. House162541369
Total2127486814
2012
U.S. Senate6310[7]000
U.S. House232043415
Total292353415

Presidential election data

  • Democrats are defending 2 seats in states won by Donald Trump (R) in the 2016 presidential election: Alabama (held by Doug Jones) and Michigan (held by Gary Peters). Trump won Alabama by 28 points and Michigan by less than 1 percentage point.
  • Republicans are defending 2 seats in states won by Hillary Clinton (D) in the 2016 presidential election: Colorado (held by Cory Gardner) and Maine (held by Susan Collins). Clinton won Colorado by 5 points and Maine by 3 points.

In 2018, Senate seats were up for election in 10 states with a Democratic incumbent that Trump won and one state with a Republican incumbent that Clinton won. Click here for more details.

Special elections

See also: Special elections to the 116th United States Congress (2019-2020)

Special elections to United States Senate are often required in the event of vacancies. This table lists special Senate elections from 2019 to 2020.

Results of special elections to the 116th Congress (Senate)
RaceElection dateIncumbentWinnerElection MOVPrevious election MOV2016 Presidential election MOV
U.S. Senate in ArizonaNovember 3, 2020 Martha McSally[8]PendingPendingD+2R+4
U.S. Senate in GeorgiaNovember 3, 2020 Johnny Isakson[9]PendingPendingR+14R+5

Historical special election data

Special elections, 2013-2020

Forty-three special elections to the United States Congress were held during the 113th, 114th, and 115th Congresses. During that time, special elections were called across 26 states—13 for seats vacated by Democrats and 27 for seats vacated by Republicans.

The table below details how many congressional seats changed parties as the result of a special election between 2013 and 2020. The numbers on the left side of the table reflect how many vacant seats were originally held by each party, while the numbers on the right side of the table show how many vacant seats each party won in special elections.

Congressional special election vacancies and results, 113th Congress to 116th Congress
CongressTotal elections heldVacancies before electionsSeats held after electionsNet change
 Democrats Republicans Democrats Republicans
116th Congress72516-1 D, +1 R
115th Congress1741389+4 D, -4 R
114th Congress72525No change
113th Congress167979No change
Averages113847N/A
U.S. Senate special election partisan change from special elections, 113th Congress to 116th Congress
PartyAs of special electionAfter special election
Democrats45
Republicans43
Total88
U.S. House special election partisan change from special elections, 113th Congress to 116th Congress
PartyAs of special electionAfter special election
Democrats1113
Republicans2826
Total3939
[show]To see a list of all the Congressional special elections referenced in the table above, click [show] at the right. 

Special elections, 1986-2012

The table below presents the results of special elections to Congress from 1986 to 2012. Contact Ballotpedia at editor@ballotpedia.org for access to earlier data.

Results of special elections to Congress (1986-2012)
Election cycleTotal special electionsU.S. House electionsSeats changing partisan controlU.S. Senate electionsSeats changing partisan control
2011-20121111NoneNoneNone
2009-201015103 (2 Democratic gains; 1 Republican gain)52 (all Republican gains)
2007-200814123 (2 Republican gains; 1 Democratic gain)2None
2005-200612123 (all Democratic gains)NoneNone
2003-200466NoneNoneNone
2001-2002652 (all Democratic gains)11 (Republican gain)
1999-2000981 (Republican gain)11 (Democratic gain)
1997-199833NoneNoneNone
1995-19961191 (Republican gain)21 (Democratic gain)
1993-1994961 (Republican gain)33 (all Republican gains)
1991-19921072 (all Republican gains)31 (Democratic gain)
1989-19901081 (Democratic gain)2None
1987-198812123 (2 Democratic gains; 1 Republican gain)NoneNone
1985-1986881 (Republican gain)NoneNone
Total13611721 (11 Democratic gains; 10 Republican gains)199 (6 Republican gains; 3 Democratic gains)

Congressional approval rating

See also: Ballotpedia’s Polling Index: Congressional approval rating

The congressional approval rating indicates public satisfaction in the job performance of the members of the United States Congress. It is the percentage of people polled who responded favorably toward the work of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/SD6eX/786/

Noteworthy events

Supreme Court vacancy, 2020

See also: Supreme Court vacancy, 2020

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on September 18, 2020. The Senate Judiciary Committee holds hearings and votes on Supreme Court nominees. The committee’s practice has been to send nominations, regardless of whether the nominee wins a majority of the committee vote, to the full Senate to allow the chamber to decide whether he or she should be confirmed.

Important dates and deadlines

The table below lists filing deadlines and primary dates in each state for Democratic Party and Republican Party candidates for congressional and state-level office.[15]

Primary dates and filing deadlines, 2020
StateFiling deadline for primary candidatesPrimary datePrimary runoff date
Alabama11/08/201903/03/20207/14/2020[16]
Arkansas11/12/201903/03/202003/31/2020
Illinois12/02/201903/17/2020N/A
California12/06/201903/03/2020N/A
Texas12/09/201903/03/202007/14/2020[17]
Ohio12/18/201904/28/2020[18]N/A
North Carolina12/20/2019[19]03/03/202006/23/2020[20]
Mississippi01/10/202003/10/202006/23/2020[21]
Kentucky01/10/202006/23/2020[22]N/A
Maryland01/24/202006/02/2020[23]N/A
West Virginia01/25/202006/09/2020[24]N/A
Indiana02/07/202006/02/2020[25]N/A
Pennsylvania02/18/202006/02/2020[26]N/A
Nebraska03/02/202005/12/2020N/A
Georgia03/06/202006/09/2020[27]08/11/2020[28]
Montana03/09/202006/02/2020N/A
New Mexico03/10/202006/02/2020N/A
Oregon03/10/202005/19/2020N/A
Idaho03/13/202006/02/2020[29]N/A
Iowa03/13/202006/02/2020N/A
Nevada03/13/202006/09/2020N/A
Maine03/16/202007/14/2020[30]N/A
Colorado03/17/202006/30/2020N/A
Utah03/19/202006/30/2020N/A
Virginia03/26/202006/23/2020[31]N/A
New Jersey03/30/202007/07/2020[32]N/A
South Carolina03/30/202006/09/202006/23/2020
Missouri03/31/202008/04/2020N/A
South Dakota03/31/202006/02/202008/11/2020
New York04/02/202006/23/2020N/A
Tennessee04/02/202008/06/2020N/A
Arizona04/06/202008/04/2020N/A
North Dakota04/06/202006/09/2020N/A
Oklahoma04/10/202006/30/202008/25/2020
Michigan04/21/2020 (offices with option to pay filing fee) &
05/08/2020 (offices requiring nominating petitions)[33]
08/04/2020N/A
Florida04/24/2020 (congressional and judicial offices) &
6/12/2020 (state legislators)
08/18/2020N/A
Massachusetts05/05/2020 (local) & 06/02/2020 (state)[34]09/01/2020N/A
Washington05/15/202008/04/2020N/A
Vermont05/28/202008/11/2020N/A
Wyoming05/29/202008/18/2020N/A
Alaska06/01/202008/18/2020N/A
Kansas06/01/202008/04/2020N/A
Wisconsin06/01/202008/11/2020N/A
Hawaii06/02/202008/08/2020N/A
Minnesota06/02/202008/11/2020N/A
Connecticut06/11/2020[35]08/11/2020N/A
New Hampshire06/12/202009/08/2020N/A
Rhode Island06/24/2020 (declaration of candidacy due)
07/10/2020 (nomination papers due)
09/08/2020N/A
Delaware07/14/202009/15/2020N/A
Louisiana07/24/2020[36]11/03/2020N/A

Ballot access requirements

The table below details filing requirements for U.S. Senate candidates in the 2020 election cycle. Note that the below information is not comprehensive. Additional information will be added as it becomes available.

Filing requirements for U.S. Senate candidates, 2020
StateOfficePartySignatures requiredSignature formulaFiling feeFiling fee formulaFiling deadlineSource
AlabamaU.S. SenateDemocraticN/AN/A$3,480.002% of annual salary11/8/2019Source
AlabamaU.S. SenateRepublicanN/AN/A$3,480.002% of annual salary11/8/2019Source
AlabamaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated51,5883% of votes cast for governor in the last electionN/AN/A3/3/2020Source
AlaskaU.S. SenateDemocraticN/AN/A$100.00Fixed number6/1/2020Source
AlaskaU.S. SenateIndependenceN/AN/A$100.00Fixed number6/1/2020Source
AlaskaU.S. SenateRepublicanN/AN/A$100.00Fixed number6/1/2020Source
AlaskaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated2,8501% of votes cast in the last general electionN/AN/A8/18/2020Source
ArizonaU.S. SenateDemocratic6,3250.5% of qualified votersN/AN/A4/6/2020Source
ArizonaU.S. SenateLibertarian3,3350.5% of qualified votersN/AN/A4/6/2020Source
ArizonaU.S. SenateRepublican6,6630.5% of qualified votersN/AN/A4/6/2020Source
ArizonaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated39,0393% of qualified votersN/AN/A4/6/2020Source
ArkansasU.S. SenateDemocraticN/AN/A$12,000.00Fixed number11/12/2019Source
ArkansasU.S. SenateRepublicanN/AN/A$20,000.00Fixed number11/12/2019Source
ArkansasU.S. SenateUnaffiliated10,0003% of total votes cast for governor in the last election, not to exceed 10,000N/AN/A5/1/2020Source
ColoradoU.S. SenateMajor party10,5001,500 per congressional districtN/AN/A3/17/2020Source
ColoradoU.S. SenateUnaffiliated7,0001,000 signatures from each congressional districtN/AN/A7/9/2020Source
DelawareU.S. SenateDemocraticN/AN/A$10,440.00Fixed number7/14/2020Source
DelawareU.S. SenateRepublicanN/AN/ATBDFixed number7/14/2020Source
DelawareU.S. SenateUnaffiliated7,1241% of all eligible votersN/AN/A9/1/2020Source
GeorgiaU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$5,220.003% of annual salary3/6/2020Source
GeorgiaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated51,6861% of voters eligible to vote for the office in the last election$5,220.003% of annual salary7/14/2020Source
IdahoU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$500.00Fixed number3/13/2020Source
IdahoU.S. SenateUnaffiliated1,000Fixed numberN/AN/A3/13/2020Source
IllinoisU.S. SenateDemocratic and Republican5,000Fixed numberN/AN/A12/2/2019Source
IllinoisU.S. SenateUnaffiliated25,0001% of voters or 25,000 voters, whichever is fewerN/AN/A6/22/2020Source
IowaU.S. SenateDemocratic3,1550.5% of votes cast for the party’s candidate for governor in 2018N/AN/A3/13/2020Source
IowaU.S. SenateRepublican3,3370.5% of votes cast for the party’s candidate for governor in 2018N/AN/A3/13/2020Source
IowaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated1,500Fixed numberN/AN/A3/13/2020Source
KansasU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$1,760.001% of annual salary plus administrative fees6/1/2020Source
KansasU.S. SenateUnaffiliated5,000Fixed number$20.00Fixed number (administrative fee)8/3/2020Source
KentuckyU.S. SenateAll parties2Fixed number$500.00Fixed number1/28/2020Source
KentuckyU.S. SenateUnaffiliated5,000Fixed number$500.00Fixed number6/2/2020Source
LouisianaU.S. SenateAll partiesN/AN/A$900.00Fixed number7/17/2020Source
LouisianaU.S. SenateUnaffiliatedN/AN/A$900.00Fixed number7/17/2020Source
MaineU.S. SenateQualified party2,000Fixed numberN/AN/A3/16/2020Source
MaineU.S. SenateUnaffiliated4,000Fixed numberN/AN/A6/1/2020Source
MassachusettsU.S. SenateAll parties10,000Fixed numberN/AN/A6/2/2020Source
MassachusettsU.S. SenateUnaffiliated10,000Fixed numberN/AN/A8/25/2020Source
MichiganU.S. SenateMajor party15,000Fixed numberN/AN/A5/8/2020Source
MichiganU.S. SenateUnaffiliated30,000Fixed numberN/AN/A7/16/2020Source
MinnesotaU.S. SenateMajor partyN/AN/A$400.00Fixed number6/2/2020Source
MinnesotaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated2,000Fixed numberN/AN/A6/2/2020Source
MississippiU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$1,000.00Fixed number1/10/2020Source
MississippiU.S. SenateUnaffiliated1,000Fixed number$1,000.00Fixed number1/10/2020Source
MontanaU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$1,740.001% of annual salary3/9/2020Source
MontanaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated12,6945% of total votes cast for successful candidate in the last general election$1,740.001% of annual salary6/1/2020Source
NebraskaU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$1,740.001% of annual salary3/2/2020Source
NebraskaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated4,000Fixed number$1,740.001% of annual salary8/3/2020Source
New HampshireU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$100.00Fixed number6/12/2020Source
New HampshireU.S. SenateUnaffiliated3,000Fixed number$100.00Fixed number9/2/2020Source
New JerseyU.S. SenateQualified party1,000Fixed numberN/AN/A3/30/2020Source
New JerseyU.S. SenateUnaffiliated800Fixed numberN/AN/A6/2/2020Source
New MexicoU.S. SenateDemocratic3,518-7,0362%-4% of votes cast for all of the party’s gubernatorial candidates in the last primaryN/AN/A3/10/2020Source
New MexicoU.S. SenateLibertarian230-4602%-4% of votes cast for all of the party’s gubernatorial candidates in the last primaryN/AN/A3/10/2020Source
New MexicoU.S. SenateRepublican1,503-3,0062%-4% of votes cast for all of the party’s gubernatorial candidates in the last primaryN/AN/A3/10/2020Source
New MexicoU.S. SenateUnaffiliated20,8943% of all votes cast for governor in the last electionN/AN/A6/25/2020Source
North CarolinaU.S. SenateRecognized partyN/AN/A$1,740.001% of annual salary12/20/2019Source
North CarolinaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated71,5451.5% of all votes cast for governor in the last election$1,740.001% of annual salary3/3/2020Source
OklahomaU.S. SenateAll candidatesN/AN/A$2,000.00Fixed number4/10/2020Source
OregonU.S. SenateMajor partyN/AN/A$150.00Fixed number3/10/2020Source
OregonU.S. SenateUnaffiliated20,0141% of votes cast in the district for presidentN/AN/A8/25/2020Source
Rhode IslandU.S. SenateRecognized party1,000Fixed numberN/AN/A7/16/2020Source
Rhode IslandU.S. SenateUnaffiliated1,000Fixed numberN/AN/A7/16/2020Source
South CarolinaU.S. SenateQualified partyN/AN/A$10,440.001% of annual salary multiplied by term of office3/30/2020Source
South CarolinaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated10,0005% of active registered voters in the state, or 10,000, whichever is lessN/AN/A8/17/2020Source
South DakotaU.S. SenateDemocratic1,6151% of all votes cast for Democratic gubernatorial nominee in last electionN/AN/A3/31/2020Source
South DakotaU.S. SenateRepublican1,7301% of all votes cast for Republican gubernatorial nominee in last electionN/AN/A3/31/2020Source
South DakotaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated3,3931% of all votes cast for governor in the last electionN/AN/A4/28/2020Source
TennesseeU.S. SenateAll candidates25Fixed numberN/AN/A4/2/2020Source
TexasU.S. SenateDemocratic or RepublicanN/AN/A$5,000.00Fixed number12/9/2019Source
TexasU.S. SenateUnaffiliated83,7171% of all votes cast for governor in the last electionN/AN/A12/9/2019 (declaration of intent); 6/25/2020 (final filing deadline)Source
VirginiaU.S. SenateQualified party10,000Fixed number$3,480.002% of annual salary3/26/2020Source
VirginiaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated10,000Fixed numberN/AN/A6/9/2020Source
West VirginiaU.S. SenateRecognized partyN/AN/A$1,740.001% of annual salary1/25/2020Source
West VirginiaU.S. SenateUnaffiliated4,5371% of all votes cast in the last election for the office being sought$1,740.001% of annual salary7/31/2020Source
WyomingU.S. SenateMajor partyN/AN/A$200.00Fixed number5/29/2020Source
WyomingU.S. SenateUnaffiliated4,0252% of all votes cast for U.S. Representative in the last election$200.00Fixed number8/25/2020Source

Wave elections

See also: Wave elections (1918-2016)

In a July 2018 report, Ballotpedia defined wave elections as the 20 percent of elections in the last 100 years resulting in the greatest seat swings against the president’s party. U.S. Senate waves from 1918 to 2016 are listed in the table below.

U.S. Senate wave elections
YearPresidentPartyElection typeSenate seats changeSenate majority[37]
1932HooverRPresidential-13D (flipped)
1958EisenhowerRSecond midterm-12D
1980CarterDPresidential-11R (flipped)
1946TrumanDFirst midterm-10R (flipped)
1942RooseveltDThird midterm-9D
2014ObamaDSecond midterm-9R (flipped)
1986ReaganRSecond midterm-8D (flipped)
2008George W. BushRPresidential-8D
1926CoolidgeRFirst midterm[38]-7R
1930HooverRFirst midterm-7R
https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/kyT8O/1/

See also

External links

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Footnotes

  1. ↑ Jump up to:1.0 1.1 Politico, “Republican Control of the Senate Hangs by a Thread,” December 21, 2017
  2. Jump up↑ This seat was last up for regular election in 2016. Incumbent John McCain (R) won re-election by a margin of 13.0 percent.
  3. Jump up↑ This seat was last up for regular election in 2016. Incumbent Johnny Isakson (R) won re-election by a margin of 13.8 percent.
  4. Jump up↑ The Cook Political Report, “2020 Senate Race Ratings”
  5. Jump up↑ Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales, “Senate Ratings”
  6. Jump up↑ Sabato’s Crystal Ball, “2020 Senate race ratings”
  7. Jump up↑ Figure includes Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.).
  8. Jump up↑ In December 2018, McSally was appointed to fill the Senate seat previously held by John McCain (R), who passed away in August 2018. Jon Kyl (R) was first appointed to the seat and held it from September 2018 to December 2018. The 2020 special election decides who will serve out the rest of the six-year term McCain was elected to in 2016.
  9. Jump up↑ Isakson announced his resignation effective December 31, 2019.The 2020 special election decides who will serve out the rest of the six-year term Isakson was elected to in 2016.
  10. Jump up↑ Both general election candidates were Republicans.
  11. Jump up↑ This race was unopposed.
  12. ↑ Jump up to:12.0 12.1 Both general election candidates were Democrats.
  13. Jump up↑ Lamb won by a margin of 0.4 percentage points.
  14. Jump up↑ Wild won by a margin of 0.2 percentage points.
  15. Jump up↑ Daily Kos, “Daily Kos Elections 2020 primary calendar,” June 4, 2019
  16. Jump up↑ Note: Alabama’s primary runoff election was postponed from March 31 to July 14, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  17. Jump up↑ Note: Texas’ primary runoff election was postponed from May 26 to July 14, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  18. Jump up↑ Note: Ohio’s primary election was postponed from March 17 to April 28, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  19. Jump up↑ Note: On November 20, 2019, a three-judge panel of North Carolina’s state superior court issued an order delaying the congressional candidate filing period for the 2020 election cycle while the state’s U.S. House district plan was reviewed. The filing period for U.S. House candidates, set to open on December 2 and close on December 20, 2019, was temporarily delayed while a three-panel judge heard arguments on December 2, 2019. The judges ruled that the redrawn congressional maps should stand, meaning the filing period would open and close as scheduled.
  20. Jump up↑ Note: North Carolina’s primary runoff election was postponed from May 12 to June 23, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  21. Jump up↑ Note: Mississippi’s primary runoff election was postponed from March 31 to June 23, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  22. Jump up↑ Note: Kentucky’s primary election was postponed from May 19 to June 23, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  23. Jump up↑ Note: Maryland’s primary election was postponed from April 28 to June 2, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  24. Jump up↑ Note: West Virginia’s primary election was postponed from May 12 to June 9, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  25. Jump up↑ Note: Indiana’s primary election was postponed from May 5 to June 2, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  26. Jump up↑ Note: Pennsylvania’s primary election was postponed from April 28 to June 2, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  27. Jump up↑ Note: Georgia’s primary election was postponed from May 19 to June 9, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  28. Jump up↑ Note: Georgia’s primary runoff election was postponed from July 21 to August 11, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  29. Jump up↑ Note: Idaho’s primary election election was postponed from May 19 to June 2, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  30. Jump up↑ Note: Maine’s primary election was postponed from June 9 to July 14, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  31. Jump up↑ Note: Virginia’s primary election was postponed from June 9 to June 23, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  32. Jump up↑ Note: New Jersey’s primary election was postponed from June 2 to July 7, 2020, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  33. Jump up↑ Note: Michigan’s primary filing deadline was postponed from April 21 to May 8, 2020, for offices that require nominating petitions and do not have the option to pay a filing fee to access the ballot. The change was in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  34. Jump up↑ To appear on the ballot in Massachusetts, prospective candidates must submit nomination papers for certification to the registrars of the cities or towns in which signatures were collected and to the Secretary of the Commonwealth. The local filing deadline must occur four weeks prior to the candidate’s second filing deadline with the Secretary of the Commonwealth. In 2020, the local-level filing deadline was May 5 and the state-level filing deadline was June 2. Click here to learn more.
  35. Jump up↑ Note: Connecticut’s candidate filing deadlines were postponed in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  36. Jump up↑ Note: Louisiana’s candidate filing deadlines were postponed in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  37. Jump up↑ Denotes the party that had more seats in the U.S. Senate following the election.
  38. Jump up↑ Calvin Coolidge’s (R) first term began in August 1923 after the death of President Warren Harding (R), who was first elected in 1920. Before he had his first midterm in 1926, Coolidge was re-elected as president in 1924.

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